Summer book recommendations

2014-07-10 1 comment

The must reads!

TheMustReads

This is Lean by Niklas Modig, Pär Åhlström

Kanban by David J. Andersson

The Goal by Eliyahu M. Goldratt

Toyota Kata by Mike Rother

The Toyota Way by Jeffrey Liker

 

Great reads!

GreatReads

The Principles of Product Development Flow by Donald G. Reinertsen

The Gold Mine by Freddy Balle and Michael Balle

Toyota Production System by Taiichi Ohno and Norman Bodek

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

 

Lean & Leadership

LeanAnd Leadership

The Toyota Way to Lean Leadership by Jeffrey Liker and Gary L. Convis

The Lean Manager by Michael Balle, Freddy Balle

The Art of Action by Stephen Bungay

Leading Lean Software Development by Mary Poppendieck and Tom Poppendieck

Change  & Caoching

ChangeAndCoaching  

Switch by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Understanding A3 Thinking by Durward K. Sobek II. and Art Smalley

Managing to Learn by John Shook

Turn the Ship Around! by David Marquet

Flow Thinking – ACE! Conference

 

 

Learn how to shift your focus from keeping people and equipment busy to having work flowing to your customers without unwanted waiting time and how that new focus will affect your meetings, process management, and metrics.

This presentation was given at ACE! Conference in Krakow, Polen 2014-06-16. Here are the rest of the session videos

Are you too busy to improve #lkse14

2014-06-01 1 comment

Here are my slides and video from my talk at the Lean Kanban Southern Europe conference in Bologna on the 30th of May.

 

Don’t we all think that we get more done if we stay busy? We feel good and efficient. We get a pat on the back or a nod of approval from the managers when pulling that all-nighter once again. It may feel good and we could even get a raise for being so efficient, but is this good for the company? Is it good for our customers?

Toyota Kata – Habits for continuous improvements MIX-IT

Here are my slides from my talk at MIX-IT 2014 in Lyon France

Building on the power of habits, Toyota Kata will help you build a culture of continuous learning and improvement, a kaizen culture.

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” – Aristotle

What are the habits, routines, behavior patterns, needed to strive for excellence every day? How do we create a culture of continuous learning and improvement?

Building on the power of habits, Toyota Kata will help you build a culture of continuous learning and improvement, a kaizen culture.

In this session, you will be introduced to the two main Kata* of the Toyota Kata, the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata. You will learn how the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata can become your “muscle memory” for continuous learning and improvements in your organization. These daily habits or routines will help you to strive towards your vision, your state of awesomeness, in small experiments focused on learning. The Improvement Kata will form the habits of doing small daily experiments focused on learning and improving. The Coaching Kata will form the habits of the leaders of the organization to help the learners learn and improve.

In this session, we will take Toyota Kata out of the manufacturing context and put it into the knowledge work context. You will learn how you can start applying the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata in a software development context tomorrow.

Time to stop collecting problems and start forming new habits of learning and improving!

(*) Kata means pattern, routine, habits or way of doing things. Kata is about creating a fast “muscle memory” of how to take action instantaneously in a situation without having to go through a slower logical procedure. A Kata is something that you practice over and over striving for perfection. If the Kata itself is relative static, the content of the Kata, as we execute it is modified based on the situation and context in real-time as it happens. A Kata as different from a routine in that it contains a continuous self-renewal process.

Ideas for now

  • How Toyota Kata can become the catalyst for creating a culture of continuous learning and improvement, a kaizen culture.
  • How Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata can become your “muscle memory” for continuous learning and improvements in your organization.
  • How the Coaching Kata will form the habits of the leaders of the organization to help the learners learn and improve.
  • How small daily experiments lower the resistance to change and builds a kaizen culture.
  • How to use the great power of habits to build a new culture.
  • How to apply the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata in a software development context

Look below the waterline to understand Lean

2014-04-05 1 comment

Iceberg

The artifacts and behaviors we can easily observe at Lean companies are only the tip of the iceberg. Waste reduction and other Lean practices, principles and tools like A3, kanban, andon and heijunka, are all important parts of Lean but it is only the tip of the iceberg. You need to look below the waterline.

“Toyota’s tools and techniques, the things you see, are built upon invisible routines of thinking and acting, particularly in management, that differ significantly from those found in most companies.”

Mike Rother in Toyota Kata : Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior Results

If you want grasp and become Lean you need to look below the waterline.

 

Read more…

Are you too busy to improve? – Focus on the system

Are you too busy to improve

This illustration is inspired by and in part derived from the work by Scott Simmerman, “The
Square Wheels Guy” http://www.performancemanagementcompany.com/

For translated versions of this image and terms of use please see this page

 

Focus on the system -Theory X

Are people in general lazy and unwilling to improve and innovate? Do people need to be closely supervised and controlled by management?

OR

Focus on the system -Theory Y

Are people in general willing to improve and innovate? Are people ambitious, self-motivated and can exercise self-control?

A bad system

Personally, I very much believe in latter. I think people do their best in the context that they are operating in. I subscribe to W. Edwards Deming’s ideas that it is the system, not the people working in the system that determines a systems performance.

 

Read more…

Nominated for the Brickell Key Award 2014!

2014 Nominees

Wow, Brickell Key Award nominee for the second time! I am really honored. A big thank you to all of you for your support and for nominating me!

Please help the committee choose me :-) and one more Brickell Key Award winner from this distinguish list of finalists

Update: The candidate support period is now over. Thank you for your support. Now it all in the hands of the Brickell Key Award committee.  Let’s hope for the best!

Update: You can now read   Brickell Key Award interview: Håkan Forss: a Sparkplug of Change, Igniting Small New Habits

Read more…

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