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Posts Tagged ‘Agile’

Waste of overproduction > waste of highly skilled people idling? – #Agile2014 Q&A part 2

How to improve Flow EfficiencyAgile 2014 P8

This is my second Q&A post for my #Agile2014 session: How to improve Flow Efficiency, Remove the Red bricks! In this, my previous and upcoming posts I will answer some of the questions I have received as session feedback after the session.

Q2: The presentation gave a full demonstration of the issue and how to address the problem. However the only issue I had with it is that it is essentially teaching to have your highly skilled, highly paid people sit and wait for work when it is ready. I would like to see the real metrics when you consider the overhead of these highly skilled people. But in general, I think you did a really good job of pointing out the issue and ways to address it. Entertaining presentation as well.

BusyWorkers BusyFlowunit

Yes, I am proposing that for some organizations, based on their context, it is a valid business/operational strategy to focus more on having the flow units (e.g. user stories, features, MVP, project) being worked on all the time over having our highly skilled, highly paid people utilized all the time.

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Agile2014 presentations

I had the great opportunity to present at two separate sessions at Agile2014 in Orlando.Here are the slides.

My first session was called “How to improve flow efficiency, remove the red bricks”

In these posts I try to answer some questions I received as feedback for this session:

The second presentation that I co-presented with Erik Schön was called “The Mental Leaps at Ericsson 3G”.

 

What is a Kata?

2014-02-13 1 comment

What is a Kata

Kata means pattern, routine, habits or way of doing things. Kata is about creating a fast “muscle memory” of how to take action instantaneously in a situation without having to go through a slower logical procedure. A Kata is something that you practice over and over striving for perfection. In the book “Managing Flow”, Ikujiro Nonaka describes Kata as a traditional Japanese code of knowledge that describes a process of synthesizing thought and behavior in skillful action; the metacognition of reflection in action. If the Kata itself is relative static, the content of the Kata, as we execute it is modified based on the situation and context in real-time as it happens. Nonaka also describes Kata as different from a routine in that it contains a continuous self-renewal process.

Metacognition of reflection in action

Kata is not to blindly copy some else method, but to improve on it in an evolutionary way. You learn and evolve a Kata through the three stages of the learning cycle Shu (learn), Ha (break) and Ri (create). In the first stage Shu, you learn by following the teacher. You imitate the teacher’s practices, values and thinking. You will only move on to the next stage when you have made the teacher’s Kata your own. In the Ha stage, you break from the teacher’s practices and make modifications based on your own creativity. In the Ri stage, you leave the teacher and you start creating your own unique Kata. As you expand your knowledge into new areas, you will loop back to the Shu stage for those areas in an ever-growing spiral of knowledge.

Muscle memory

Categories: Agile, Lean Tags: , , ,

The Lean Agile roundtable at Lean IT Summit 2013

In October I had the great opportunity to be part of the 3rd Lean IT Summit in Paris. This conference was really one of the highlight of my 2013 conference season.

On the second day of the conference I had the great opportunity to be part of the Lean Agile roundtable. The participants of the panel was (from the left) Pierre Pezziardi, Steve Bell , me, Mike Orzen, Michael Ballé, Daniel T Jones, Regis Medina, Takashi Tanaka, Laurent Bossavit, and Antoine Contal (moderator). Below is the recording of the roundtable. Please enjoy.

Stop Doing Retrospectives – Agile Adria 2013

2013-07-04 1 comment

 

You have been doing agile for a few years now. With a regular cadence you have retrospectives and a lot of problems and great improvement opportunities are raised but nothing seems to really improve. Stop doing retrospectives!

It is time to take your improvement work to a whole new level! It’s time to shift your focus form collecting problems to making small experiments! It’s time to create the daily habits of continuous improvement. It is time to start using Toyota Kata!

In this session you will get a practical introduction to Toyota Kata. You will learn about the two Kata’s, behavior patterns, of Toyota Kata. You will follow a team that goes through the two Kata’s and improves its way of working.

 

This is the presentation I gave at Agile Adria, Terme Tuhelj, Croatia, April 22-23, 2013

The red brick cancer ACE! Conf 2013-04-16

 

This is the presentation I gave at ACE! Conference in Krakow the 16th of April.

Related post:

LESS!

I’m happy to announce that the collection of business transformation essays called LESS!, that I co-authored, is now published.

It is free and you can get it here. LESS!_cover

When you have read it, please write a review at GoodReads.

This is a book of twelve essays written by me and my co-authors who all work in the trenches, building business, coaching leaders and shaping the future. This book contains the following main topics:

  • Beyond Budgeting–Changing the way the organization is managed from command and control to an empowered, adaptive and agile model
  • Radical Management–Rethink the fundamental assumptions about management
  • Strategic Navigation–Use OODA Loops and the ancient Chinese 36 Stratagems to outthink the competition
  • Lean–Do more with LESS! resources
  • Agile–working software, no pain
  • Systems Thinking–An easier, better way to think about organizations
  • Complexity Thinking–Radical insights about organizations and management coming from the complexity sciences
    The title of my essay is “Standard work in Software development”. In this essay I explore the application of the Lean tool called Standard work in software development. You can find my blog posts on the subject here.
    I want to give a special thank you to Henrik Mårtensson for his tireless efforts of editing and making the book ready for publishing. Thank you!

Dan Bergh Johnsson@danbjson

Bjarte Bogsnes@bbogsnes

Peter Bunce

Steve Denning@stevedenning

Ola Ellnestam@ellnestam

Håkan Forss@hakanforss

Brian Hawkes

Maarit Laanti

Henrik Mårtensson@Kallokain

Karl Scotland@kjscotland

Ari-Pekka Skarp@apskarp

James Sutton@LeanSE

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